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(via Why Spotify can never be profitable: The secret demands of record labels — Tech News and Analysis
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"Music streaming service Pandora has just filed a new version of its S-1 that indicates the company will be pricing its stock at $7 to $9 per share. Pandora’s stock will be traded on The New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “P.”"

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Pandora Prices IPO At $7 To $9 Per Share At Valuation Over $1B, Raising $141.6M

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An infographic that gets a grip on the U.S housing bubble and foreclosure epidemic. Scary stuff.

(via Rate of U.S. Foreclosures Predict Continued Weakness in Housing Market and Economy [graphic] | Graphic.is)

An infographic that gets a grip on the U.S housing bubble and foreclosure epidemic. Scary stuff.

(via Rate of U.S. Foreclosures Predict Continued Weakness in Housing Market and Economy [graphic] | Graphic.is)

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Ever Wonder What Information Your Credit Card Number Contains?

Budget Planner Software - Mint.com

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The Wealthiest Americans of All Time

Mint.com

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Take advertising alone, which is a defining feature of living in a consumer-oriented society. The political slogans of the Mao era have been largely replaced over the past few decades with advertisements. Now advertisements are ubiquitous. I’ve even encountered LCDs blasting me with ads in toilet stalls, cabs and elevators.

As with so much in China, the transformation has been both dramatic and rapid. China’s ad market has grown by 40 percent a year over the last two decades; some reports expect China to replace the United States as the world’s largest ad market as soon as 2020. Nearly all Chinese, rich and poor, have access to TVs and the advertising that comes with it. So even the poor are aware of all the new products and services spreading in China.

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Book Chat: The Impact of China’s Consumers - NYTimes.com

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A TED talk with the economic genius Benoit Mandelbrot.

Roughness. Economics. Fractal geometry. Financial turbulence. Data. Geek out.

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A majority of poll respondents think the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a non-profit created by Congress that helps fund NPR and PBS as well as other public media, receives a share of 1 percent or more of the federal government’s budget.

In the financial year for 2010, the CPB reported receiving $506 million in federal appropriations. According to the White House’s Office of Management and Budget, the federal budget for 2010 was $3.456 trillion. Using those numbers, the CPB receives about .00014 percent of the federal budget.

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(via Politico, On Media Blog)

Because of the recent tumult at NPR it’s probably a moot point now, but what if the CPB did receive 1% of GDP?